Parallax Views

search

Mar. 2 - May. 25, 2013
Main Gallery

Opening Reception
March 1, 6pm-8pm
All welcome

Exhibiting Artists:
Elizabeth Bryant
Alex Clausen
Kathryn Dunlevie
Matthias Geiger
Liz Hickok
Allison Hunter
Elise Irving
Georg Kuettinger
Lori Nix
Laura Plageman
Tracey Snelling
Jennifer Williams
Patrick D. Wilson

Download the Exhibition Guide

View Exhibition images on Flickr slideshow

parallax: an apparent change in the direction of an object, caused by a change in observational position that provides a new line of sight […from Greek parallaxis, from parallassein, to change] American Heritage Dictionary

Whether by photographing environments they have constructed or through deconstructing and reworking photographs they have taken, the artists in Parallax Views offer the viewer a new line of sight.  Faced with the contemporary overload of images, these artists have altered, blended, and re-mixed their photographs in order to offer revitalizing views of the world. In contrast with straight photography, each of these works show evidence of some kind of modification – occurring either before or after the image capture.                                                        

Liz Hickok, Lori Nix and Tracey Snelling fabricate miniature worlds and document them photographically, creating disorienting alterations in scale. One has a sense of dislocation while entering improbable, dreamlike landscapes. In the works of Elizabeth Bryant, Alex Clausen and Laura Plageman, the interplay between sculptural and photographic information brings about perplexing compositions. Through disruption, reorganization, and an oscillation between image and object, these works synthesize more than one vantage point. By digitally altering their photographs, Allison Hunter, Matthias Geiger and Georg Kuettinger create changes in observational position. Hunter relocates and reinterprets her subjects, Geiger “allows past, present and future moments to appear simultaneously”, and in Kuettinger’s works multiple perspectives are stretched, shifted and compressed.

In the works of Kathryn Dunlevie, Elise Irving, Jennifer Williams, and Patrick D. Wilson, photographs are used as raw material for handmade constructions. Dunlevie and Irving investigate apparent inconsistencies in time and space and explore ideas of multiple realities and unseen dimensions. Williams’ compositions are meant to show the viewers what they are missing, and Wilson strives to create works that contain a depth within the surface. Seen as a group, these artists’ works offer a multifaceted vision of our time, a map with an array of possible routes.

 

 





date_1
date_2

Character Limit

Character Limit



Character Limit

Character Limit

upload

Add New



date_1
date_2

Character Limit

Character Limit



Character Limit

Character Limit

    upload


    Search Engine Data




    Add Page




    Settings